I use tarot and oracle cards as tools for reflection and contemplation. Rather than divining the future, they are a way for me to look more deeply at the "now."
"The goal isn't to arrive, but to meander, to saunter, to make your life a holy wandering." ~ Rami Shapiro

Sunday, September 18, 2016

It's Not What You Think

This week I'll be using the Rohrig Tarot, created by Carl W. Rohrig and published by Sirio. I also have a companion book written by the artist and Francesca Marzano-Fritz and published by Bluestar Communications. The other deck I'll be drawing from is called a tarot, but I'll be using it as an oracle: the Master Tarot. It was created by Amerigo Folchi and Mario Montano and published by AG Muller. Today's cards are the Hanged Man and the Priest:
           The authors explain that the Magus has given up his search for Truth to live the life of a mystic. The search itself had become an obstacle, and he now realizes what he seeks is within. The active, masculine side of his nature is replaced with the passive feminine in order to be receptive to what arises. Absolute surrender and acceptance is required, therefore all struggles (both mental and physical) have ceased. His first vision is the Priest, holding a tablet of stone with ten commandments. His followers try to shield themselves from the words, knowing they can never live such perfect lives. The Priest (unlike the average monotheistic leader) tells them his job is not to shame or manipulate with threats, but to encourage them to live a life of love. The key, he explains, is to realize morality (external values) will never replace one's internal values (spirituality). They may provide guidelines, but they will never have the same influence as what is within. The hard part is getting in touch with what one truly believes, not just in the mind but in the heart. To live by these values will allow for discernment rather than judgment, seeing clearly and objectively what is true rather than being influenced by preferences or prejudices.

8 comments:

  1. I made a miniature copy of the Rohrig for a 16-inch Tonner fashion doll I have. I even made it a mini tuck box. It's one of those decks that hold up for me.

    Discernment is a big thing, isn't it? We could call it the shadow world of morality. Reminds me of a certain candidate for US President, who seems to have no knowledge of the constitution, law or love, and a lot about shame and manipulation. People need to avoid slogans and walls and think within about discernment.

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    1. Ack, the cantaloupe candidate is a master at using fear and anger to manipulate people. His followers are more impressed by what he says than what he actually does. Not a discerning one among them, I don't think.

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  2. Inner moral compass more reliable, grounding and demanding than external rules. Perhaps the rules are for those who never developed a practical philosophy or ethics?

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    1. I've met folks who were "drug up" rather than raised, and had no moral compass. I can see how external rules (morality) might help them - at least give them a starting point. But unless it becomes internal, I don't see it making a real difference. The discrepancy is seen all the time when preachers and outspoken religious folks suddenly are exposed for immoral behavior.

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  3. I wish we had priests and ministers like him in our tempels and churches. I'll bet Jesus would prefer that too :D

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    1. I think most churches and houses of worship are simply a way to power and money, unfortunately. The historical Jesus was a social reformer who wanted to make sure the poor and outcasts were taken care of, who believed love was much more important than law. The modern church seems to have those values reversed.

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  4. "the search itself had become the obstacle"
    Same thing I realized in my mid 50's. So much more fun to navel gaze :)

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    1. Totally missing what's right in front of us.

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