I use tarot and oracle cards as tools for reflection and contemplation. Rather than divining the future, they are a way for me to look more deeply at the "now."
"The goal isn't to arrive, but to meander, to saunter, to make your life a holy wandering." ~ Rami Shapiro

Thursday, November 3, 2016

Money Motivator

From the Navigators of the Mystic Sea, the King of Pentacles; from the Celtic Lenormand, the Tower:
          The King of Pentacles may be successful, but he is still a practical sort of fellow when it comes to spending or investing money. His keyword is 'motivation,' which makes me think he wouldn't just want to know how a loan would be used. He would also want to know why - what motivates you to spend not only money but time and energy too. Is the motive a purely self-serving one, or would it be beneficial to others as well? Why does this propel and provoke you - what's the story underneath what you want to do? The Hill Fort is the Celtic version of the Tower. It was the place where the chieftain resided, and also where the rest of the clan would converge if there was a threat to their safety. The hill fort was the Celtic adaptation of 'circling the wagons' for security. Now this idea of wanting to protect something or someone would definitely be an idea the King would understand and back.

14 comments:

  1. Lots of Pentacles this week. Hard work pays off, count your pennies, or lots of magic surrounding you?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Must be hard work and time management. :)

      Delete
  2. Did you know the majors are reversed in this deck, begin with the world and work toward the fool? As life might be in a perfect world, working back to innocence.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That would explain the way the lwb is set up! :)

      Delete
  3. I've learned the most important lesson about having a creative enterprise and I believe it to be relevant to every business. I had to learn to connect the dots to these four point things.

    Answering questions about who I am, what I stand for and why. Finding out my purpose and vision based on my values that are above and beyond what I do.

    Once I know why, I can determine my mission, my what, that problem is worth solving.

    Answering how I'm going to solve a particular problem that genuinely helps others.

    Determining who has this problem worth solving, and celebrating their values that you share with them.

    Money can't be the motivator. I think this is what's wrong with the world. Greed, selfishness, and helping no one is a path that leads to no where, but a lifeless, hopeless, dead end.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree - what we are passionate about and what gives us purpose is what makes doing something worthwhile, not the money.

      Delete
  4. Hmm, for me this week I think it's my motivation itself I need to protect. Self-doubt and self-criticism are not good replacements for honest, loving self-reflection. Back to the self-compassion website for me :D

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's an insight I need to heed as well. Already my inner critic is saying "Your art is too simple, who's going to be interested in this?" I can feel my original passion and motivation backing in a corner!

      Delete
    2. What continues to make all the difference for me Bev is knowing that confidence is earned by focused action. Artists notoriously lack confidence and focus.

      Focused action yield results.
      Results yield confidence.

      Delete
    3. I can see how bringing a vision into concrete form can be hard to do, and why focused action is so needed. That kind of action is doable for me, but the confidence is lagging behind. :)

      Delete
  5. I understand that Bev. The confidence more often than not doesn't come first. Little by slowly it increases.

    I'm not interested in having a career in art which is the touted myth often pushed in art schools and by the art establishment.
    A new creative class is emerging!

    There are so many perpetuated myths about being an artist. Not much wonder artists don't have confidence. It's an unrealistic set standard most can never measure up to. And lets face it, the art establishment is still controlled by men, though women are the majority of art students, and still very unrepresented in galleries and museums. I don't buy into the myth about getting discovered! But I certainly am dedicated to having a creative enterprise, making money creating art. Setting goals and concrete objectives are a big part of that and business skills that directly relate to being an artist. We sell emotion not widgets! Keep creating your art, and tell that inner critic to f' off! ;)You don't need any approval but your own.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for the encouragement my friend!

      Delete
    2. Hey that's what artists need to do for one another. Lift each other up with encouragement not tear one another down competing.

      I vividly remember the feeling in the pit of my gut. I absolutely detested how I felt years ago when I brought some of my work to a person who'd owned a local gallery. I was wanting to exhibit there. When she proceeded to tell me what she wanted, telling me what acceptable and suitable work and then of course wanting a percentage of whatever I sold usually 50% in the cities. I knew right there and then I'm outta here, and I'll not be back! I certainly didn't need her validation by asking for her permission to exhibit or sell my work. Galleries are so fickle because next week you'll be yesterdays news when the next "big thing" comes along. Many commercial, and I might add elitist galleries and reps are going out of business. Exhibiting in Coop and artist run galleries and centres are the future. More and more artists are finally beginning to see this.

      Delete
    3. Hurrah for co-ops and artist-run galleries - sounds like a fantastic forward step for the artist community. :)

      Delete