I use tarot and oracle cards as tools for reflection and contemplation. Rather than divining the future, they are a way for me to look more deeply at the "now."
"The goal isn't to arrive, but to meander, to saunter, to make your life a holy wandering." ~ Rami Shapiro

Saturday, September 24, 2016

Finding Balance in the Dark Night

From the Rohrig Tarot, the Two of Disks; from the Master Tarot, Twice Born:
          The Rohrig Two of Disks has a much more natural feel to it than its RWS cousin. A swoosh of moist air rises from the water and winds between the two spheres.The moist air suggests an emotional tie between what is happening in the outer world and the inner. Just as the weather is constantly changing, so too is life. We can either adapt or suffer (and we will indeed suffer if we refuse to accept such changes). The Thoth calls this card Harmonious Balance, suggesting that there is a way to walk with equanimity between gains and losses, weakness and strength. The Twice Born card refers to the raising of Lazarus from the dead. The deck's booklet makes the comparison between this event and experiencing the dark night of the soul. I think I'll let Eckhart Tolle explain this one:
It is a term used to describe what one could call a collapse of a perceived meaning in life…an eruption into your life of a deep sense of meaninglessness.  The inner state in some cases is very close to what is conventionally called depression.  Nothing makes sense anymore, there’s no purpose to anything.  Sometimes it’s triggered by some external event, some disaster perhaps, on an external level.  The death of someone close to you could trigger it, especially premature death, for example if your child dies.  Or you had built up your life, and given it meaning – and the meaning that you had given your life, your activities, your achievements, where you are going, what is considered important, and the meaning that you had given your life for some reason collapses.
It can happen if something happens that you can’t explain away anymore, some disaster which seems to invalidate the meaning that your life had before.  Really what has collapsed then is the whole conceptual framework for your life, the meaning that your mind had given it.  So that results in a dark place.  But people have gone into that, and then there is the possibility that you emerge out of that into a transformed state of consciousness.  Life has meaning again, but it’s no longer a conceptual meaning that you can necessarily explain.  Quite often it’s from there that people awaken out of their conceptual sense of reality, which has collapsed.
They awaken into something deeper, which is no longer based on concepts in your mind.  A deeper sense of purpose or connectedness with a greater life that is not dependent on explanations or anything conceptual any longer.  It’s a kind of re-birth.  The dark night of the soul is a kind of death that you die.  What dies is the egoic sense of self.  Of course, death is always painful, but nothing real has actually died there – only an illusory identity.  Now it is probably the case that some people who’ve gone through this transformation realized that they had to go through that, in order to bring about a spiritual awakening.  Often it is part of the awakening process, the death of the old self and the birth of the true self.

10 comments:

  1. Although my dark nights are ink black, in hindsight they were my the most illuminating experiences and stepping stones to a greater sense of balance

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You made me think of a quote:
      “When it is dark enough, you can see the stars.”
      ― Ralph Waldo Emerson
      :)

      Delete
  2. I wonder how many lifetimes across the eons it will take for me/us to live a completely awakened life. No more 'dark nights of the soul' no more anguish and despair. No more trials and tribulation? Why do we think we need these lessons? Even knowing that we are spirit incarnate we still put ourselves through the paces.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If I can look at my challenges as adventures with a sense of curiosity rather than despair, it helps. :)

      Delete
  3. Master tarot looks to be a interestingly unique deck. I haven't come across it before. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's based on Christian mythology, but the author of the booklet uses the stories in a metaphorical rather than literal way. :)

      Delete
    2. A sensible approach. Bible stories rather than absolute truth reminds me I still haven't read Pullman's The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ.

      Delete
    3. I didn't know about that Pullman book - I'll have to check it out.

      Delete

  4. https://www.theguardian.com/books/2010/apr/04/scoundrel-christ-pullman-review

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Now that's a different, rather interesting twist!

      Delete