I use tarot and oracle cards as tools for reflection and contemplation. Rather than divining the future, they are a way for me to look more deeply at the "now."
"The goal isn't to arrive, but to meander, to saunter, to make your life a holy wandering." ~ Rami Shapiro

Thursday, May 5, 2016

One Cube or Two?

From the Transformational Tarot, the Prince (Knight) of Cups; from the Celtic Book of the Dead, the Apple:
          Ando describes this Knight as an idealist, a person who cherishes and pursues noble principles and causes. These visionaries can point us to something better, but when they cross the border into hyper-idealism, they've lost all practical usefulness. Just look at Narcissus, whose perfect love was himself; that relationship didn't turn out too well. Don't get me wrong, I do think we need dreamers to shake us from our complacency. But can you imagine this guy taking out the trash for his wife and helping coach his kid's tee ball team? There's nothing wrong with dreaming of a better world, but it won't amount to a hill of beans if there's no way to make it real. The Apple is a gift from the Celtic otherworld that represents wholeness and healing. The challenge it presents asks: "What is your heart's desire? Eliminate the 'oughts' and 'shoulds' from your heart." That makes me wonder (now that I've slammed the Knight of Cups) if perhaps I am too practical and grounded. Sure his idealism is sugary sweet, but maybe I need at least one or two of his cubes to sweeten my outlook.


8 comments:

  1. Your level common sense guides me every day. Change nothing.


    after all, it's all about me. Isn't it? :)

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    1. Heehee, you are an enabler my friend. :)

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  2. If I went to the reflection pond, I wonder what I would see?

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    1. I bet you would be so impressed with the koi swimming around, it would be a mindful moment. :)

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  3. I find it hard to really look deep into that pond. I'd rather do the dishes and vacuum the floor :)

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    1. Sometimes it's the practical we must attend to! :)

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  4. Unlike our dear Ellen, I'd be musing at the pond...about the nature of the apple in the realm beside me, its color and texture, its metaphorical significance, its role in our collective psyche...which would get me thinking about The Garden, and snakes and Eve and whether women's roles have changed all that much...and, well you get the Knight-of-Cups drift I'm riding ;)

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    1. The book says that unlike the Judaeo-Christian apple of discord, the Celtic apple had nothing to do with sin and punishment but was about wholeness and healing. I think I prefer that mythology! :)

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